RECOMMENDED TRUMPET INSTRUCTION BOOKS

  • Warm Ups and Studies, James Stamp, Editions BIM
  • Roy Poper’s Guide to the Brasswind Methods of James Stamp, Balquhidder Music
  • The Buzzing Book, James Thompson, Editions BIM
  • 27 Groups of Exercises, Earl Irons, Southern Music
  • Method for Trumpet, Anthony Plog, Balquhidder Music
  • Flexus, Laurie Frink/John McNeil, OmniTonePress

ORGANIZING THE JAZZ PRACTICE ROUTINE

Part I - Technique

  • scales
  • chords
  • melodic patterns

Part II - Transcribing and Listening

  • scheduling time to listen
  • transcribing solos, tunes, passages
  • playing transcribed solos
  • extracting new melodic patterns

Part III - Improvising

  • learning new tunes
  • memorizing tunes
  • using play a long CDs
  • playing with other people

LEARNING TUNES

Recordings of the Tune (multiple)

  • Vocal and instrumental interpretations of the tune

Awareness of Tune Types

  • Standard (II – Vs “Autumn Leaves”)
  • Mixed Modal (“Windows”)
  • Plateau Modal (“So What”/”Maiden Voyage”)
  • Blues (usually 12 bars)
  • Combination Modal and II – Vs

Determine the Form (stucture)

  • Sections (8 bars or longer)
  • Phrases of the Melody/Harmony

Memorize the Melody

  • Discover lyrics
  • Analyze Phrases (length, shape, melodic rhythm)
  • Make the melody a part of you – create your interpretation

Memorize Harmony

  • Associate harmony/harmonic movement with the melody – each melody note is a chord tone or non – chord tone – learn to hear the chord with these melody tones
  • Analyze how harmony moves (II – V or modal)
  • Analyze harmonic phrases – most of the time moves exactly with melody
  • Memorize a phrase at a time
  • Play the chord arpeggio if needed
  • Notice chord root movement
  • Notice common tones and tones that change from chord to chord (stepwise/chromatic)
  • Discover guide tones lines in chord progression (multiple)
  • Ultimately, be able to write out chord progression and play melody, both from memory
    (It takes me about a month to really learn, memorized and get inside a tune – be patient.)

PRACTICING THE TUNE – PART I

  • Play A Long recordings are great, they help with: hearing the harmony, intonation, time feel, and in most cases you have the opportunity to play along with some great players.
  • Play the tune as a ballad first in order to be confident with all of the harmony
  • If you find yourself “skating” over some harmonic passages – stop – and play only that harmonic passage – until you feel confident with expressing the harmony. You might spend an hour on just that one passage.
  • I prefer to practice tunes without accompaniment, solo
  • Always use a metronome and vary the tempos

PRACTICING THE TUNE – PART II – IMPROVISATIONAL CONCEPTS

  • Time Feel, swing and groove are the most important aspect – define with metronome – play to count 1
  • Play short melodic ideas that defines the harmony (1 – 2 bars)
  • Play complete phrases (beginning – middle – end)
  • Play call and response phrases
  • Play symmetrical phrases (following harmonic flow, usually 4 bars)
  • Play asymmetrical phrases (variances against harmonic flow – “across the barline”)
  • Discover multiple guide tone lines (esp. with II – Vs) – play off of these lines
  • Discover common tones and stepwise/chromatic movement between chords – define
  • Incorporate Phrase Shapes: linear, tertial, leaps of 4ths, wide leaps
  • Motific Development: state a short, melodic, rhythmic idea and develop it throughout the chorus
  • Take a rhythmic approach, like the drummer


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